dewalt leaf blower how to and troubleshooting guide
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Dewalt Leaf Blower How to and Troubleshooting Guide

Dewalt leaf blowers are some of the best in the market. not only do they have variable speed settings that make them ideal for use in different jobs, but they also have a lower decibel rating as compared to other leaf blower brands in the market.

They also deliver a high maximum air volume per minute making them one of the best leaf blowers money can buy. However, even the best tool or gadget can malfunction from time to time. Keep reading to learn how to use your Dewalt leaf blower efficiently and to troubleshoot it when it stops working properly.

Dewalt Leaf Blower Will Not Start

Troubleshooting corded Dewalt leaf blower

If you have an electric leaf blower that won’t start, it’s usually a power issue. Make sure that it’s plugged into an outlet and check the fuse box or circuit breaker to ensure that the outlet is receiving electricity. If your outlet is protected by a ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI), you may need to press its “Test” and “Reset” buttons before trying to start the blower again. When a blower is receiving power but still won’t start, it’s time to take it to a service center.

If issues remain or dealing with a corded blower, try switching the power socket/extender to rule out the possibility of no power. Another problem may also be bad contact of the power switch which can be tested using a voltage tester. Lastly, you may have blown a fuse. Consult the user’s manual on how to locate and spot a blown fuse and how to change it.

Troubleshooting cordless Dewalt leaf blower

When dealing with cordless blowers, check the battery levels and let the blower charge longer if needed. Try plugging it into a socket and starting it.  If it starts, your battery may have lost wattage due to overuse and is not able to start its engine on its own. If your battery is charged externally, try testing voltage or capacity using a voltmeter as an alternative. Better yet, if you have a spare battery, pop it in and see if that helps!

Dewalt Battery Charging Procedure

The correct procedure for charging your batteries is as follows;

  • Discharge the battery under normal use. Remove the battery, once you feel a loss of power from the tool.
  • Do not tape the trigger ON.
  • Let the battery sit out of the charger for a least 2 hours until the battery is at room temperature.3. Place the battery in the charger overnight to allow for a full charge on each individual cell (A minimum of 8 hours at room temperature).

If there is no difference in run-time, there is either permanent damage or the battery has reached the end of its usable life. In either case, the battery should be replaced.

Dewalt Leaf Blower Battery Won’t Charge

  • Insert the battery into the charger until the red charging light illuminates. Charge up to 8 hours if the battery is totally drained.
  • Plug charger into a working outlet.
  • Check current at receptacle by plugging an appliance into it.
  • Check to see if the receptacle is connected to a light switch that turns the power off when you turn out the lights.
  • Move charger and tool to a surrounding air temperature above 40 °F (4.5 °C) or below 105 °F (40.5 °C).

How to Reset a DeWalt Battery

DeWalt cordless leaf blowers use a rechargeable nickel-cadmium battery pack so you don’t have to deal with electrical extension cords. Or work on connecting them to an electrical outlet.

While the battery packs are quick to charge and long-lasting, they contain a microchip that shuts the battery pack off if it overheats. Once the battery pack shuts off, you have to reset it. The reset process clears the microchip’s memory and gives the chip the “all clear” to charge normally.

To reset the battery;

  • Press the battery pack removal button, located on the back of the power tool’s handle, to release the battery pack from the DeWalt power tool.
  • Slide the battery pack along the rail track, on the bottom of the power tool, to remove the pack.
  • Place the battery pack into the battery pack charger with the metal contact side matching the metal contacts in the charger.
  • Let the battery pack charge for eight hours. Your DeWalt battery pack is now reset.

Dewalt Battery and Charger Troubleshooting

Batteries and chargers are the downsides of cordless tools.  The convenience of these battery-powered tools is unquestionable.  However, batteries and chargers do eventually fail, and disposing of these items is a problem.

And while Dewalt battery chargers are reliable, they may fail from time to time and your batteries will end up draining quickly over time. The best way to determine if it’s time to replace a Dewalt charger is to try to charge a fresh battery and compare it to an old battery.

How to test a Dewalt Charger

Items needed

  • Your Dewalt battery charger
  • The battery with charging problems
  • A good Dewalt battery that is partially for fully charged.

Note: Test the good battery in your tool to make sure it is delivering power to the tool. Most new Dewalt batteries have an indicator on the battery that shows the charge condition.  You can push the button on the battery to see the charge level remaining.

Testing the Charger

  1. Plug your Dewalt charger into the outlet and wait a few seconds when it is ready to charge batteries it’s indicator light will turn red. 
  2. Then plug in the good battery and watch the battery charger indicator light.
  3. Blinking red light means the battery is charging normally.
  4. Yellow light indicates that the battery is either too hot or too cold.  And will go off when the battery reaches a stable temperature.
  5. The red light may stop blinking when the battery reaches full charge.
  6. If all of the charger lights go off, the battery pack has a fault, and the charger stops. No lights can indicate a bad battery or a problem with the charger.
  7. Repeat the process with the bad battery.
  8. If the Dewalt battery charger normally operates with a good battery, repeat the above process with the battery that won’t charge. 
  9. If the charger shows a fault, more than likely, the battery is bad and not the charger.
  10. Take your battery and charger to a Dewalt center to get them tested and buy a replacement if the charger is damaged.

Testing the Battery with a Multimeter

  • Power up your multimeter and wait a few seconds for the meter to stabilize.
  • Set your multimeter to test Volts and DC.  Volts DC is usually indicated by a V and a straight horizontal line with a series of dashes or dots underneath. 
  • If your multimeter has a range setting, set the multimeter to whichever range includes 12 to 20 volts.
  • Examine the battery and ensure the case of the battery does not have any cracks or significant damage. 
  • If the battery’s case is cracked or shows other signs of damage, recycle the battery.
  • Also, look for leaks.  If one of the cells in the battery is damaged, it may leak highly toxic chemicals. 
  • If you notice any leak, wrap the battery in a plastic bag. You should take the bag and battery immediately to a recycling center that handles hazardous waste.
  • Then locate the positive and negative contacts on the battery.  These contacts have a + and – sign.
  • Plug the black probe into the common plug on the multimeter.  Plug the red probe into the VOLTS connection on your multimeter.
  • Touch the black probe to the negative (-) contact on the battery. 
  • Touch the red probe to the positive (+) contact and read the multimeter.
  • A fully charged Dewalt battery should read close to 20 volts. 
  • If the battery voltage indicator lights show the battery fully charged.
  • If you don’t get a reading of at least 18 volts on the multimeter, the battery probably has a problem.

Dewalt Leaf Blower Hose Won’t Stay Attached

Check the tubes of your blower if the hose does not stay attached. If your tubes are in good shape, then you might also need to replace the elbow, nozzles, or clamps. This is a common symptom for blowers and our repair guide will help you identify the part you will need to fix this problem. This is a general guide for your repair; for more detailed information on your model, refer to the owner’s manual.

Damaged Clamps

The blower tubes are held in place by two metal clamps. The first clamp holds the flexible tube in place against the air outlet, and the second holds the middle tube in place against the other end of the flexible tube. The clamps are usually adjustable to fit many different blower models. If the clamp becomes corroded or damaged, it may not hold the plastic components of the blower tube in place. The clamp may not have been sufficiently tightened in the first place, resulting in parts of the blower tube coming loose. Check your clamp for damage and replace it with a new one if necessary. You will need a screwdriver to remove and replace the clamp.

Damaged Nozzles

The plastic nozzle or end pipe is the end part of the blower hose, which comes in closest contact with the leaves and other debris you are using the blower on. This part is made of plastic and attaches to the middle tube via notches in the plastic. If the notches become damaged or worn, they may not hold the nozzle in place correctly.

Turn the nozzle to “unlock” it, and check to make sure it is able to lock back into place securely. If the notches on either the nozzle or the middle tube are damaged and won’t hold the nozzle in place, both the middle tube and nozzle should be replaced.

Damaged Tubes

The blower tubes on a leaf blower typically consist of one flexible plastic tube, and one straight plastic tube called the middle tube. They attach to form one long tube, with a plastic nozzle on the end. The tubes and nozzle together are sometimes referred to as the blower hose. If the blower hose won’t stay attached to the air outlet, it could be because one or more of the tubes are cracked, misshapen, or damaged.

You will need a screwdriver to disassemble the blower tubes to check them for damage. Turn the nozzle to the left to slide it out from the middle tube. Then, use a screwdriver to loosen the tube clamps and the knob which holds the throttle-holder in place. Pull out both tubes and inspect them for damage.

Damaged Elbow

The elbow tube on a leaf blower is the curved tube that sits between the air outlet and the flexible tube on the blower hose. On some leaf blower models which also function as leaf vacuums, the elbow may connect directly to the blower bag. If the entire blower tube won’t stay connected, it is likely that there is an issue with the elbow tube, as that is the first part in the blower tube assembly.

This part is usually made of plastic and may have a rubber seal on either end. Make sure the rubber is not cracked or warped, causing the connection to the rest of the blower tubes to be weak. To inspect this part, remove the tube clamps with a screwdriver and slide out each tube.

Ensure the elbow is not cracked or damaged, and that it is properly connected to the blower vacuum bag, if applicable. If the elbow tube is damaged, replace it with the correct size tube for your blower model.

Dewalt Leaf Blower Engine Lacks Power

If your blower’s engine lacks power, check our symptom and repair guide to help you identify the problem. We will guide you in choosing the most appropriate part to replace, such as the cylinder, muffler, or air filter. This is a common symptom and you can have your engine working in no time.

Batteries

The battery provides the power to the motor in cordless, electric models. A bad battery can lead to a loss of power in your leaf blower. Order the correct battery replacement for your model; most use a lithium ion battery. The battery should easily pop out of the body of the blower.

Air Filters

If your leaf blower engine is lacking power, it could be due to a blocked air filter. A plugged air filter will restrict airflow into the engine, reducing power and performance. Changing the air filter is an easy fix, and should solve this issue. Disconnect the spark plug before beginning this repair to your leaf blower.

The air filter is typically a foam rectangle surrounded by a rubber holder, located behind a plastic cover on the exterior of the blower. Loosen the plastic knobs or clips holding the cover on, and pull out the air filter and holder. Pop-out the foam rectangle and insert your new air filter.

Spark Plugs

A weak spark plug can cause incomplete combustion, resulting in a loss of power in your leaf blower. The spark plug may be weak because it is incorrectly gapped or has been fouled with gasoline, in which case it will need to be replaced. You will need a spark plug wrench or socket wrench to change the spark plug. Start by disconnecting the spark plug boot, then remove the spark plug with the socket wrench. The correct gap for your spark plug will vary depending on the model; check your owner manual to find out the correct gap size. Thread the new spark plug into the housing, and tighten with the socket wrench.

Dewalt Leaf Blower Vibrates Excessively

If the engine on your blower vibrates too much, there might be a problem with the impeller, retainer, isolator, cushion, or fan. For more guidance on the repair process and how to identify your problem, follow our repair guide. Note: this is a general repair guide. Check the manual provided by your owner for more specific repair information related to your model.

Fans

Your leaf blower’s fan can also be known as the impeller, and it spins to create the airflow used by your blower. To generate this airflow, the fan has several blades that direct the air when the fan is spinning. These blades can occasionally break, and a broken fan blade can result in excess vibration.

Some leaf blowers can also be used as a vacuum. Occasionally dirt and debris can be sucked up into the fan blades and damage them. Dirt can accumulate on the fan blades, which can result in excess vibration as well.

Washers

The washers within your leaf blower generally won’t cause excessive vibration during normal operation or as a result of normal wear. However, if a washer is lost, it can ultimately cause other parts like the isolators or impeller to vibrate excessively. Sometimes, when a leaf blower is disassembled, washers can be reinstalled in the incorrect location. This can result in more vibration than normal as well.

Retainers

For the most part, the impeller on your leaf blower will be secured to the crankshaft by a lock nut. However, in some models, a retainer is used, and it can cause a bad vibration if it is missing. In most cases, if you notice that your retainer is missing, you can simply replace it, and that will fix this symptom.

Impellers

Your leaf blower’s impeller spins on the crankshaft to generate airflow. It can also be known as a fan and has blades (the number of which differ from model to model) that create the flow of air as they turn. If one or more of these blades have broken off, they can cause the blower to vibrate excessively. Debris is sucked into the impeller blades can cause them to break, so be sure to clean out the housing if it becomes clogged.

Isolators

Isolators or isolator mounts are commonly found on backpack-style leaf blowers. Your leaf blower’s isolator mounts are designed to separate the harness from the blower itself. This should reduce the vibration felt by the operator during operation. Isolators are typically made of rubber, and as a result, they can wear down over time. If the isolator is worn out, the blower’s normal vibration will become much more noticeable for the user.

Cushions

If your leaf blower is a backpack blower, it will have cushions on the shoulder straps that are designed to minimize strain on your shoulders. These are particularly useful because backpack blowers tend to be a little heavier than handheld blowers, and tend to produce a bit more power.

Because of this added power, backpack blowers tend to vibrate more during normal operation. If you feel that your backpack blower is vibrating excessively, it may be because the cushions are old or worn down. Therefore, normal vibration may become much more noticeable to the operator. These cushions can usually be replaced individually, as opposed to buying a brand-new leaf blower.

Dewalt Leaf Blower Making Clicking or Rubbing Sound from Blower Fan

If your blower fan is making a clicking, rubbing, or loud noise, you will need to check the following parts: the housing, washers, flywheel, or impeller nut. Our repair and symptom guide will help you better identify the part needed to be replaced and how. If you need specific repair instructions related to your model, refer to the manual provided by the manufacturer.

Housings

The plastic impeller housing functions as a plastic cover to shield the impeller, also known as a fan. The housing can become warped or damaged over time, either by impact from an object or from placing the blower roughly on its side. If the housing is warped, it may cause the fan blade to hit the side of the housing, resulting in the clicking or rubbing noise. The impeller housing is a fairly easy part to replace and can be done by removing the screws which hold it in place and screwing in the new part. There may also be a clip that attaches to your blower tubes to secure them in place when replacing the housing.

Nuts

If the impeller nut comes loose, the impeller can begin to wobble and strike the housings. The impeller is secured to the crankshaft, or motor assembly, by a nut. Sometimes it is a lock nut, other times the nut is secured with Loctite. Disconnect the spark plug before servicing your leaf blower. Remove the impeller housing to inspect the nut, and replace if necessary. You will need a wrench to unscrew the nut, and to screw in the new one.

Washers

Most blowers have a washer in front of and behind the impeller where it mounts to the crankshaft. A missing or worn washer can change the impeller spacing, causing it to wobble and rub against the housing.

To replace the impeller washers, follow the instructions above for removing the impeller housing and nut, first making sure to remove the spark plug. Check the washers for wear and tear or misalignment, and replace if necessary.

Flywheels

A damaged flywheel magnet could strike against the ignition coil in your leaf blower, causing a clicking or rubbing noise. To inspect the blower for this issue, first, remove the spark plug. Follow the instructions above for removing the impeller housing, nut, and impeller. Turn to the other side of the blower and remove the air filter cover and side cover.

Next, remove the throttle cable from the carburetor. You can now remove the other half of the housing from the engine assembly by unscrewing the screws which hold it in place. The flywheel is a metal disc-shaped part, which can be removed by sliding off the washer which holds it on the shaft, and striking the end of the shaft with a rubber mallet while lightly pulling off the flywheel at the same time. If the magnet is damaged, the flywheel will need to be replaced. Match up the…

Impellers

Leaf blowers use an impeller, also known as a fan, to blow the air outward. Air is pulled in via the impeller through the housing, and blown out through the blower tubes. A clicking noise coming from your blower could simply be due to a leaf caught in the impeller. Leaf blowers are prone to accumulating dirt and debris such as leaves because of how they’re used, especially if your leaf blower also functions as a vacuum.

The fan blade could also be broken or damaged, causing it to make a noise each time it rotates. A good indicator that the fan/impeller is causing this issue is if the noise occurs with the same frequency as the fan rotation. Always disconnect the spark plug before beginning a repair on your leaf blower.

The location of the impeller varies depending on your model; it may be on the side of the blower, or behind a plastic impeller housing which can be removed by unscrewing several screws. Regardless of its location, the impeller is connected to the motor assembly which needs to be held still in order to remove the impeller. Always disconnect the spark plug before beginning a repair on your leaf blower.

Thread an object such as the starter rope, or a screwdriver through the cylinder to keep the motor assembly from rotating. Remove the bolt holding the impeller in place, and replace it with your new part.

Dewalt Leaf Blower Doesn’t Blow Air

If your blower is not blowing air, check the following parts in your appliance: the impeller nut, fan, and tubes. Our guide will help you identify the problem accurately and walk you through the repair process. This is a general guide for your repair; for more detailed information on your model, refer to the owner’s manual.

Fans

Your leaf blower manual may refer to a fan, which is simply another name for the impeller. As above, the fan is attached to the crankshaft, and when it rotates it provides airflow. Your leaf blower’s fan will have several fins that move the air while the fan is operating.

Occasionally, rocks and debris can be sucked up into these fins, causing damage. Damaged fins can cause the fan to malfunction, resulting in the inability to blow air. See the above description of the impeller for more information on why a faulty or damaged fan might cause this symptom.

Nuts

The impeller nut attaches the impeller or fan to the crankshaft. Sometimes the impeller nut is a lock nut, but other times the nut is secured with Loctite. If the nut comes lose the crankshaft might spin without rotating the impeller. If the impeller does not rotate, then airflow is not created, which will result in this symptom. To complete this repair, you will need to access the inside of your leaf blower, so be sure that you have disconnected the spark plug from the blower engine before you begin this repair.

Tubes

The tubes in your leaf blower typically direct the flow of air during operation. However, in some models, the tubes funnel air down to a nozzle that increases the speed of the airflow. In this case, it might seem as if the blower isn’t blowing air, or isn’t blowing enough air. This can be a result of missing or damaged tubes.

Note: Before you replace your tubes: some leaf blowers allow you to redirect the airflow passing through the blower housing, which allows the blower to act as a vacuum. In this case, your blower may be on the incorrect setting, which can prevent it from blowing air.

Impellers

If your blower starts and the throttle runs properly but it still does not blow air, there are a variety of parts that might be causing it. The impeller is essentially a fan blade that draws air into the blower housing and forces it out the blower tube.

The impeller is installed in the blower housing, where you can find it attached to the crankshaft of the engine. When the crankshaft turns, it rotates the impeller, which causes air to flow through the blower.

If your leaf blower does not blow air, it is possible that debris has been sucked into the blower housing. This will impede the impeller from doing its job. If the impeller is loose or the blades of the impeller are damaged or broken off, it can also cause the blower to become unable to blow air.

Dewalt Leaf Blower Engine Dies At Full Throttle

Air Filters

If the air filter in your leaf blower is partially plugged, it can cause your engine to run, but die at full throttle. The air filter is designed to prevent debris from entering the engine, and over time this debris can accumulate and lead to a clog. When it is clogged, the air filter will allow just enough air through to the engine to idle, but when you engage the throttle, it will shut down. A clogged air filter may cause your blower to idle roughly as well. Air filters can be cleaned to ensure they run properly and should be inspected as part of your normal blower maintenance routine.

Mufflers

The function of the muffler is to decrease engine noise from your leaf blower. The spark arrestor prevents sparks from the engine from exiting the blower and potentially starting a fire. When your leaf blower expels exhaust gasses, they travel through the exhaust port into the muffler and spark arrestor. Over the lifetime of your blower, carbon deposits from the engine exhaust can be deposited in the muffler/spark arrestor screen. If the exhaust port, muffler, or spark arrested does become plugged with carbon, the exhaust gases can’t exit the engine. This can result in your engine dying at full throttle. These deposits can build up over time, so it is recommended that you clean your muffler/spark arrestor during routine maintenance.

Why Can’t I Turn Off My Dewalt Leaf Blower Engine?

Not being able to turn off the engine is a relatively rare symptom, but one we can help you with. If this occurs, there are multiple parts to check, such as the harness, lever, rod, trigger, and more.

Levers

A lever actuates the ignition switch on your leaf blower. When the ignition switch is set to the “on” or “run” position, the circuit that the switch controls are open. In other words, no current is flowing through the switch. To turn the engine off, the ignition switch is set to off or a kill switch is depressed. This creates a circuit from the ignition coil straight to the engine ground.

As a result, the spark plug no longer fires and the engine shuts off. If the lever on your leaf blower is damaged or malfunctioning, it will not allow the circuit to be created, and the engine will not turn off. If the lever becomes damaged or malfunctions during operation, you will not be able to turn off the engine. A damaged lever may also result in your engine being unable to turn on if the damage occurs while the…

Switches

The ignition switch is turned on or off to control the ignition circuit. However, if your engine relies on the ignition switch to complete the circuit and shut down the engine, a damaged switch can result in the engine continuing to run. In either setup, the switch would be the culprit. If the switch is an on/off type it is creating a circuit to the ground when it is off.

The circuit opens when it is switched on, allowing the current to flow to the spark plug. In a kill switch setup, the switch normally does not create a circuit that allows the engine to start and run. When you want to shut the engine off, the switch is depressed and held. This creates a circuit to the ground which shuts off the engine.

Harnesses

The wire harness in your leaf blower houses the wires that connect the ignition switch to the ignition coil and protects them from being damaged. If the wire harness is faulty, it can result in loose or damaged wires. This in turn disrupts the function of the ignition switch and does not allow the engine to turn off. If damage is done to the wire harness while the blower is not operating, it will result in the engine being unable to turn on.

Triggers

Many electric blowers have trigger switches that could cause the motor to stay on. The trigger in your leaf blower can also be known as the throttle control lever and controls the speed at which the blower is blowing air. If the trigger on your leaf blower becomes damaged or stuck, it will affect your ability to control the power of the blower. This will keep you from being able to turn off the blower engine.

Rods

Some blower switches could be activated by a part called a rod. This completes or interrupts the ignition circuit, turning the engine on or off. Like the function of the lever above, if the rod is damaged or malfunctioning, it could result in the engine becoming unable to turn off.

Ignition Modules

The ignition module in your leaf blower is also known as the ignition coil. The ignition coil or module works with the flywheel to induce electricity and subsequently sends voltage to the spark plug. Often when there is a malfunction in the ignition module, it is a result of a faulty or damaged wire or a bad connection. If the wire mounting tab for the kill wire broke off the ignition coil, you will not be able to turn off the engine. As you will be working near the engine of the leaf blower for this repair, be sure to disconnect

Dewalt Leaf Blower Engine Misfires

Although engine misfires in blowers are among the rarer problems our customer’s experience, using our repair and troubleshooting guide can help you identify the issue and the part needed to be repaired, such as the boot or ignition coil. Our repair information is a general guide to help you, but for more specific repair information related to your model, check your owner’s manual.

Springs

If your leaf blower has a 4-cycle engine, a broken or weak valve spring could cause a misfire. The valve spring provides compression for the intake and exhaust valves. If the valve spring is broken or worn, the compression required to fire the engine will not be created, resulting in a misfire. Because of the pressure, these springs are constantly under, they can wear and crack, and you will need to replace them before your leaf blower operates properly. The valve spring works closely with the intake and exhaust valves, so if the spring is not the problem, the valve could also be damaged or stuck.

Flywheels

The flywheel is critical to the combustion process in your leaf blower. It controls the timing on a 2-cycle engine. A broken key can allow the flywheel to become offset on the crankshaft, causing the timing to be off, which results in a misfire. If you’ve already checked your spark plug and ignition coil and have determined that they are in working order, you may want to check your flywheel. In order to replace this part, you will have to open up the blower casing to access the flywheel for repair.

Boots

The spark plug boot covers the connection between the spark plug and the plug wire. If the boot is cracked or torn, the current can ground to the frame rather than going to the spark plug, resulting in a misfire. If your spark plug boot is damaged and you plan to replace it, you may find that adding a drop of liquid dish soap to the old boot will help you to pull it free of the old wire. Before you install the new spark plug boot, be sure that the terminal spring is still intact. As with any leaf blower repair, be sure that the engine has cooled down and the ignition switch is set to the “off” position before you begin.

Ignition Modules

The ignition coil in your leaf blower works with the flywheel and the spark plug to supply the charge that ignites during combustion. The ignition coil’s role is to supply voltage from the flywheel to the spark plug. Therefore, if you have a bad or damaged ignition coil, your engine could misfire. Before you check the ignition coil, make sure your spark plug is still in good working order. To test the ignition coil you will need a spark tester, which will accurately recreate the cylinder conditions. Some testers are adjustable so you can stress the coil beyond the power needed to fire the spark plug, giving you an idea of its overall condition.

Dewalt Leaf Blower Keeps Shutting Off

When an electric motor runs for a short time and then stops, only a couple of things can cause it;

The motor is damaged

The motor is a brush-style motor, and there is brush damage.  Sometimes when the brushes on an electric motor wear out, it can cause the motor to run and then stop.  Usually, this means the motor needs replacement in the case of most electric leaf blowers.

Interrupted power supply

There is a shortage in the electrical system. A loose wire, terminal, or connection can cause an electric motor to stop suddenly. To remedy this issue, start at one end of the circuit and move along the circuit, checking every connection along the way. 

Always check the on/off switch.  It is a standard part of the electrical system to break down. Ensure there’s power in the socket you have the leaf blower plugged into.

Plug and Cable

The plug and cable are basic leaf blower parts that can give trouble because of the treatment they receive. To check the plug (unless it is welded to the cable) you need to take the cover off.

Look to see if the terminals inside the plug have come loose. To correct this problem, reconnect the terminals. To check the cable, examine it inch by inch to make sure it has not been cut or worn, causing a short circuit or no circuit at all.

Leaf Blower Terminals

If you have an electric leaf blower, use a mains tester to check that power is arriving at the terminals in the leaf blower.

Impeller or Fan

Unplug the leaf blower and check that the impeller or fan has not been jammed by a stick or other object so that it cannot turn. If the impeller can move, turn it by hand to see if you can hear a grinding noise. If the bearings on the impeller have worn out, they could lock up when power is applied to the shaft.

Electric Motor

Open the inspection hatch for the electric motor and check that the central spindle will turn. When everything else checks out, there are only two possibilities left. The first is that there is a thermal cut out on the leaf blower. The second is that the electric motor is not working.

Check Again

Plug the leaf blower in again and test it. If it still will not work and if there is power arriving at the leaf blower, you now need to check the on/off switch. Unplug the leaf blower and use a circuit tester to ensure that the on/off switch is working properly.

Thermal Cut Out

A thermal cut-out will usually reset itself after about 30 minutes, or there will be a reset button on the machine. If there isn’t a reset button and the machine still won’t work, the final possibility is that the electric motor needs new brushes. Replacing the brushes in the motor will require purchasing some new parts for your electric leaf blower.

Dewalt Leaf Blower Running but Not Blowing

Blower Fan

Your leaf blower manual may refer to a fan, which is simply another name for the impeller. As above, the fan is attached to the crankshaft, and when it rotates it provides airflow. Your leaf blower’s fan will have several fins that move the air while the fan is operating.

Rocks and debris can be sucked up into these fins, causing damage. Damaged fins can cause the fan to malfunction, resulting in the inability to blow air. See the above description of the impeller for more information on why a faulty or damaged fan might cause this symptom.

Nuts

The impeller nut attaches the impeller or fan to the crankshaft. Sometimes the impeller nut is a lock nut, but other times the nut is secured with Loctite. If the nut comes to lose the crankshaft might spin without rotating the impeller. If the impeller does not rotate, then airflow is not created, which will result in this symptom.

Tubes

The tubes in your leaf blower typically direct the flow of air during operation. However, in some models, the tubes funnel air down to a nozzle that increases the speed of the airflow. In this case, it might seem as if the blower isn’t blowing air, or isn’t blowing enough air. This can be a result of missing or damaged tubes.

Impellers

If your blower starts and the throttle runs properly but it still does not blow air, there are a variety of parts that might be causing it. The impeller is essentially a fan blade that draws air into the blower housing and forces it out the blower tube. The impeller is installed in the blower housing, where you can find it attached to the crankshaft of the engine.

When the crankshaft turns, it rotates the impeller, which causes air to flow through the blower. If your leaf blower does not blow air, it is possible that debris has been sucked into the blower housing, impeding the impeller from doing its job. If the impeller is loose or the blades of the impeller are damaged or broken off, it can also cause the blower to become unable to blow air.

Dewalt Leaf Blower Not Blowing as Hard as Usual

If your blower’s engine lacks power, check our symptom and repair guide to help you identify the problem. We will guide you in choosing the most appropriate part to replace, such as the cylinder, muffler, or air filter. This is a common symptom and you can have your engine working in no time.

Reasons why your leaf blower has no power;

Batteries

The battery provides the power to the motor in cordless, electric models. A bad battery can lead to a loss of power in your leaf blower. Order the correct battery replacement for your model; most use a lithium ion battery. The battery should easily pop out of the body of the blower.

Air Filters

If your leaf blower engine is lacking power, it could be due to a blocked air filter. A plugged air filter will restrict airflow into the engine, reducing power and performance. Changing the air filter is an easy fix, and should solve this issue. Disconnect the spark plug before beginning this repair to your leaf blower.

The air filter is typically a foam rectangle surrounded by a rubber holder, located behind a plastic cover on the exterior of the blower. Loosen the plastic knobs or clips holding the cover on, and pull out the air filter and holder. Pop-out the foam rectangle and insert your new air filter.

Dewalt Lithium Ion Battery Storage and Safety Tips

Below are the Do’s and Don’ts of using your Dewalt Battery

  • Use only authentic DEWALT batteries for best performance and safe compatibility with DEWALT tools and chargers.
  • Store and charge batteries in a cool, dry location.
  • Avoid exposing batteries to liquids, oils, or extreme temperatures.
  • Clean batteries with a clean, slightly damp cloth; do not use solvents.
  • If your battery no longer holds a charge, take them to a DEWALT Service Center near you for fast, free, and safe disposal.
  • Follow proper transportation guidelines. For instance, engage the red transport cap when shipping FLEXVOLT batteries.
  • Disengage battery from tool before placing into storage for extended periods.
  • Fully charge battery before storing for extended periods (longer than 6 months).
  • Do not use batteries with visible damage or cracks.
  • Visit a DEWALT Service Center for help with your battery.
  • Do not attempt repair or service.

How to Increase Dewalt Battery Life

  1. Stop using a battery as soon as you feel a substantial decrease in power from the tool. Completely running down a battery may damage it. Do not tape the trigger to run down the battery.
  2. Temperature affects the battery. If the batteries are too hot (105°F or higher) or too cold (below 40°F), the batteries will not take a full charge. Attempting to charge batteries outside the 40°F-105°F range can result in a permanent loss of run-time. When batteries are being charged and discharged, a chemical reaction is taking place, and if it is too hot or cold the chemical reaction is disturbed causing a loss of run-time.
  3. Transport with care. Transporting batteries can possibly cause fires if the battery terminals inadvertently come in contact with conductive materials such as keys, coins, hand tools and the like. Ensure that the battery terminals are protected and well insulated from materials that could contact them and cause a short circuit; anytime you transport individual batteries.

Dewalt Blower Engine Rpm’s Too High

If your blower engine RPMs are running too high, you might need to check the fan, impeller, rod, or governors. Below are the main reasons why this is happening.

Broken Fan Blades

The fan on your blower is also known as an impeller and spins to draw air into the blower. The air that is pulled in through the side of the housing by the fan, is directed to the front of the blower through the blower tube. If several of the blades of the fan are broken off, it can cause the engine’s RPM to increase. During the life of your blower, debris can inadvertently be drawn into the fan blades, and this can cause them to break. Be sure to clear out any debris that enters the blower housing to help avoid this issue.

Broken Impellers

The impeller is critical to the proper function of your leaf blower. Also known as a fan, the impeller rotates to draw air in, at which time it is redirected through the blower tube. A broken impeller, which is normally caused by debris entering the blower housing and damaging the fan blades, can result in your engine RPM running too high. Be sure to keep the blower housing clear of debris to reduce the likelihood of your impeller blades breaking.

Loose Rods

If you have a large, wheeled blower with a 4-cycle engine, you will have a rod that links the throttle control to the governor’s arm. The governor is designed to regulate the speed of the engine regardless of conditions. The governor will increase the throttle in tougher conditions to maintain the speed. If the rod that connects the governor to the throttle becomes loose or is damaged, it will not allow the governor to control the throttle. This can result in your engine RPMs running too high.

Faulty or Loose Governors

A large, wheeled blower with a 4-cycle engine could have a damaged or incorrectly set governor. The governor in your leaf blower is designed to maintain the desired speed. It works in conjunction with the throttle to control that speed. If your governor is incorrectly set, it can cause your engine RPMs to run too high. A damaged governor or governor’s arm can result in higher-than-normal engine RPMs as well.

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