echo leaf blower how to and troubleshooting guide
Tips & Tricks

Echo Leaf Blower How to and Troubleshooting Guide

While raking is an easy chore that you can have your kids do, the constant raking may end up being an unwanted chore after some time. And given that your trees are bound to shed leaves a couple of times in the cause of the year, you may need a blower to handle the leaves. Especially if you have several trees in your yard.

The Echo leaf blower is one of the best options you can own. Not only is it affordable, it is also reliable performance-wise and durable. However, even the most reliable tool can fail from time to time. Keep reading to learn how to troubleshoot and fix your Echo leaf blower.

Why does my Echo leaf blower not start?

The most common reason that may cause your leaf blower not to work is the lack of a spark. Below is a list of issues that can also prevent your leaf blower from starting up;

Damaged Spark Plug

Inspect the spark plug for signs of wear or damage. If the porcelain insulator is cracked, an electrode is burned away or damaged, or there is heavy carbon buildup at the electrode, replace the spark plug.

To determine if the spark plug is defective, use a spark plug tester. You should see a strong spark between the tester’s terminals when the engine is cranking. If there is no spark, this indicates that the spark plug is defective and should be replaced.

Blocked Carburetor

The carburetor might be clogged. A clogged carburetor is most commonly caused by leaving fuel in the leaf blower for a long period of time. Over time, some of the ingredients in the fuel may evaporate, leaving behind a thicker, stickier substance.

This sticky fuel can clog up the carburetor and prevent the engine from starting. If the carburetor is clogged, try cleaning it with carburetor cleaner. If cleaning the carburetor isn’t effective, rebuild or replace the entire carburetor.

Recoil Starter

The recoil starter assembly engages the crankshaft to turn over the engine. If the recoil starter assembly is defective, the leaf blower won’t start. Remove the starter assembly and inspect it to determine if it is working properly.

When you pull the starter rope, tabs extending from the pulley and cam should grab the hub on the engine, causing the engine to turn. When you release the rope, the tabs should retract and the rope should rewind back on the pulley. If the recoil starter assembly is n…

Recoil Starter Pulley

The recoil starter pulley winds up the starter rope when the rope is not in use. If the recoil pulley is broken or stuck, it won’t be able to rewind the starter rope. As a result, the engine won’t start. If the recoil starter pulley is broken, replace it.

Rewind Pulley and Spring

The rewind spring might be broken. When the starter rope is pulled and released, the rewind spring recoils the starter rope onto a pulley. If the rewind spring is broken, the rope won’t be able to recoil onto the chainsaw pulley.

As a result, the engine won’t start. If the rewind spring is broken, replace it. Many rewind springs can be replaced individually, but it may be easier to replace the entire rewind pulley and spring assembly.

Rewind Spring

The rewind spring might be broken. When the starter rope is pulled and released, the rewind spring recoils the starter rope onto a pulley. If the rewind spring is broken, the rope won’t be able to recoil onto the chainsaw pulley. As a result, the engine won’t start. If the rewind spring is broken, replace it. Many rewind springs can be replaced individually, but it may be easier to replace the whole recoil starter assembly.

Fuel Filter

The fuel filter might be clogged. A clogged fuel filter is most commonly caused by leaving fuel in the leaf blower for a long period of time. Over time, some of the ingredients in the fuel may evaporate, leaving behind a thicker, stickier substance. This sticky fuel can clog up the fuel filter and prevent the engine from starting. If old fuel was left in the leaf blower, drain the old fuel from the fuel tank and replace the fuel filter.

Spark Arrestor

The spark arrestor is a small screen that prevents the engine from emitting sparks. Over time, the spark arrestor can become clogged with soot. If the spark arrestor is clogged, the engine may not start. To unclog the spark arrestor, remove it and clean it with a wire brush. You may also replace the spark arrestor.

Air Filter

The air filter may be clogged. If the air filter is clogged, the engine will get too much fuel and not enough air. As a result, the engine may not start. If the air filter is clogged, replace it.

Ignition Coil

The ignition coil sends voltage to the spark plug while the engine is running. If the ignition coil is defective, the engine may not start. Before replacing the ignition coil, ensure that the spark plug is working properly. If you have confirmed that the spark plug is working properly, test the ignition coil with an ignition coil tester. If the ignition coil is defective, replace it.

How to turn on Echo pb-250 leaf blower

  1. Move stop switch button away from the STOP position.
  2. Then move throttle position lever midway between idle and full throttle positions.
  3. Then move the choke to Cold Start.
  4. Next, pump the purge bulb until fuel is visible and flows freely in the clear fuel tank return line.
  5. Recoil starter: Use short pulls – only 1/2 ~ 2/3 of rope for starting.
  6. Do not allow the rope to snap back in. Always hold the unit firmly.
  7. Place the unit on a flat, clear area. Firmly grasp throttle grip with left hand and rapidly pull recoil starter handle/rope (E) until engine fires, or maximum 5 pulls.
  8. Move the choke lever to Run position, and if necessary, restart engine.
  9. If engine does not start after 5 pulls, repeat instructions 3-6.
  10. After the engine warms up, gradually depress throttle trigger to increase engine RPM to operating speed.

Note: Allow the engine to warm up for three minutes before use.

Why does my Echo leaf blower turn off when I give it gas?

If your leaf blower dies at full throttle, check the fuel filter, air filter, and more if the engine in your blower will idle, but stalls on the throttle.

Air Filters

If the air filter in your leaf blower is partially plugged, it can cause your engine to run, but die at full throttle. The air filter is designed to prevent debris from entering the engine, and over time this debris can accumulate and lead to a clog. When it is clogged, the air filter will allow just enough air through to the engine to idle, but when you engage the throttle, it will shut down.

A clogged air filter may cause your blower to idle roughly as well. Air filters can be cleaned to ensure they run properly, and should be inspected as part of your normal blower maintenance routine.

Fuel Filters

The fuel filter in your leaf blower is located inside the fuel tank and is attached to the fuel line. The function of the fuel filter is to prevent debris in the fuel tank from entering the fuel line and the blower’s engine. If the fuel filter is partially clogged, the engine still may have enough fuel reaching it to start up, and to idle for a while.

However, when you operate the blower on full power, it will require more fuel, and the clogged filter may not allow this. Therefore, the engine will die at full power. You will need a screwdriver or hook to pull the fuel line out of the fuel tank to access the fuel filter. Be sure there is little to no fuel in the fuel tank before you begin this repair. As with all repairs, it is best to disconnect the spark plug before…

Mufflers

The function of the muffler is to decrease engine noise from your leaf blower. The spark arrestor prevents sparks from the engine from exiting the blower and potentially starting a fire. When your leaf blower expels exhaust gasses, they travel through the exhaust port into the muffler and spark arrestor.

Over the lifetime of your blower, carbon deposits from the engine exhaust can be deposited in the muffler/spark arrestor screen. If the exhaust port, muffler, or spark arrested does become plugged with carbon, the exhaust gases can’t exit the engine.

This can result in your engine dying at full throttle. These deposits can build up over time, so it is recommended that you clean your muffler/spark arrestor during routine maintenance.

Carburetor

Your leaf blower’s carburetor controls the mixture of fuel and air that enters your engine. If the carburetor is clogged, it may not allow fuel into the engine, which will cause the engine to run, but die when the throttle is engaged.

Often you can disassemble your carburetor, clean it, and re-install it to fix this symptom. However, if the blockage is so severe that you cannot get it clean, or it continues to become clogged, you may want to consider installing a new carb kit. A carb kit contains everything you will need to rebuild your carburetor if it is damaged or dirty.

To avoid confusion when putting your carburetor back together, it is a good idea to make note of the order in which you remove certain carburetor parts. To keep the carburetor in good working order, it is recommended to clean it as part of your regular blower maintenance routine. 

Fuel Lines

As with the fuel filter, a damaged fuel line can deprive your engine of fuel, causing it to run briefly but die when the throttle is engaged. Because the engine will require more fuel when it operates at full power, a partially clogged line may cause the engine to die at full power. A small crack in the fuel line can also let air in, which can result in this symptom as well.

Why does my Echo leaf blower keep stalling?

Check the parts below to see if they are the cause of your leaf blower stalling;

Spark Arrestor

The spark arrestor is a small screen that prevents the engine from emitting sparks. Over time, the spark arrestor can become clogged with soot. If the spark arrestor is clogged, the engine may stall. To unclog the spark arrestor, remove it and clean it with a wire brush. You may also replace the spark arrestor.

Carburetor

The carburetor might be clogged. A clogged carburetor is most commonly caused by leaving fuel in the leaf blower for a long period of time. Over time, some of the ingredients in the fuel may evaporate, leaving behind a thicker, stickier substance.

This sticky fuel can clog up the carburetor and cause the engine to stall. If the carburetor is clogged, try cleaning it with carburetor cleaner. If cleaning the carburetor isn’t effective, rebuild or replace the entire carburetor.

Fuel Filter

The fuel filter might be clogged. A clogged fuel filter is most commonly caused by leaving old fuel in the leaf blower. Over time, some of the ingredients in the fuel may evaporate, leaving behind a thicker, stickier substance. This sticky fuel can clog the fuel filter and cause the engine to stall. If old fuel was left in the leaf blower, drain the old fuel from the fuel tank and replace the fuel filter.

Air Filter

The air filter may be clogged or dirty. If the air filter is clogged, the engine will get too much fuel and not enough air. As a result, the engine may stall. If the air filter is clogged, replace it.

Echo leaf blower won’t start when hot

A gas-powered leaf blower uses a combustion engine to generate power. Normally, when this engine burns gas, the vapors and heated gases are vented away, so the engine can stay cool enough to keep running. If the engine dies after warming up, it is likely the engine is overheating and automatically shutting down to prevent more serious damage.

Vapor Lock

Vapor lock occurs when the fuel already inside the carburetor overheats and the vapors cause the fuel pump to lock up. A vent on the gas cap allows those heated gases to escape, which prevents the fuel inside the tank and in the fuel system from overheating.

To check for vapor lock, after the engine shuts down again, unscrew the gas cap slightly and try starting the engine again. If it runs without shutting off again, vapor lock is causing the problem. Replace the gas cap, or clean it thoroughly with a brush dipped in fresh gasoline.

Air Supply Blocked

As the engine starts moving, the internal temperatures also start rising. To keep the engine running, cooler air needs to be brought in, and the heated gases need to escape. If the air filter or muffler are blocked, the engine will overheat and shut off again. Take out the air filter and wash it in soapy water. Clean the spark arrestor screen inside the muffler, and scrub out the muffler and exhaust port with a brush. Brush off the fins around the cylinder.

Diaphragms Warped

The carburetor inside a leaf blower uses several plastic diaphragms to bring fuel into the carburetor, mix and measure the fuel and send it off to the cylinder. These diaphragms can warp after several seasons of use. This warping will cause the fuel to stop moving through the entire circuit, and the engine will shut off.

Usually, this happens when the engine starts heating up, as the diaphragms aren’t completely shot yet, but are starting to go. Remove, disassemble and clean the carburetor. Check for any perforations in the diaphragm and gaskets.

Cylinder Problems

If the engine is dying in rough fits and shakes, and the starter rope is hard to pull out after the engine dies, the likely cause of the problem is inside the cylinder. If air is entering the cylinder from a leak around the seals, the result is a loss of compression.

This compression is required to keep the piston and crankcase moving, and, without it, the engine can’t start. Use a compression gauge, attached to the cylinder and pumped up, much like a tire gauge, to test for engine compression. If the compression reading drops off rapidly, take the leaf blower to a mechanic.

Why is my Echo leaf blower losing power?

Below are some reasons why your leaf blower is losing power;

Bad Batteries

The battery provides the power to the motor in cordless, electric models. A bad battery can lead to a loss of power in your leaf blower. Order the correct battery replacement for your model; most use a lithium ion battery. The battery should easily pop out of the body of the blower.

Air Filters

If your leaf blower engine is lacking power, it could be due to a blocked air filter. A plugged air filter will restrict airflow into the engine, reducing power and performance. Changing the air filter is an easy fix, and should solve this issue. Disconnect the spark plug before beginning this repair to your leaf blower.

The air filter is typically a foam rectangle surrounded by a rubber holder, located behind a plastic cover on the exterior of the blower. Loosen the plastic knobs or clips holding the cover on, and pull out the air filter and holder. Pop out the foam rectangle and insert your new air filter.

Plugged Mufflers

A plugged muffler, spark arrestor, or cylinder exhaust port will restrict the exhaust gases from exiting the engine and reduce the engine power. These parts get plugged with carbon caused by a rich fuel mixture.

Correcting the fuel mix ratio could solve this issue; consult your owner’s manual to check what the proper ratio for your model is. If your muffler needs to be replaced, first disconnect the spark plug.

Follow the instructions above for removing the air filter, and unscrew the engine housing cover. Next, unscrew the bolts which hold the muffler in place and remove the muffler assembly. Place your new muffler in the existing muffler cover, and reassemble the parts in reverse order.

Damaged Pistons

The piston, piston rings, and cylinder work together to maintain the compression in the engine. If the piston rings or the cylinder are worn, your blower will lose power. These parts can become damaged for many reasons, such as running your blower with an incorrect fuel ratio.

The most common reason to replace this part is because the piston rings are worn. Often, the whole piston assembly will need to be replaced if there is damage, and sometimes the cylinder will need to be replaced as well. The piston assembly consists of the piston, piston rings, connecting rod and its bearings. This repair is somewhat difficult but can be done.

Damaged Spark Plugs

A weak spark plug can cause incomplete combustion, resulting in a loss of power in your leaf blower. The spark plug may be weak because it is incorrectly gapped or has been fouled with gasoline, in which case it will need to be replaced. You will need a spark plug wrench or socket wrench to change the spark plug.

Start by disconnecting the spark plug boot, then remove the spark plug with the socket wrench. The correct gap for your spark plug will vary depending on the model; check your owner manual to find out the correct gap size. Thread the new spark plug into the housing, and tighten with the socket wrench.

Cylinders

The cylinder works together with the piston rings to maintain the compression in the blower engine. If the piston rings or the cylinder are worn, power will be lost. The cylinder can become damaged due to the blower being run with an incorrect fuel ratio, or no oil at all.

This issue can also occur if dirt filters into the cylinder from the carburetor. To replace the cylinder, the engine will need to be disassembled and the piston and rings will likely need to be replaced as well. Make sure to disconnect the spark plug before beginning work on your leaf blower.

How to adjust the carburetor on Echo PB-250 blower

Carburetor adjustment is necessary if the leaf blower is performing sluggishly or is idling too low, or stalling. The carburetor is the center of fuel and air mixing before being injected into the cylinder when the throttle opens. Compromised fuel-to-air mixture or improper throttle setting can affect the performance of the engine.

Adjusting the carburetor is done by turning three separate screws. The idle speed screw adjusts the engine’s speed. The “Lo” speed screw controls the amount of fuel at low speed. The “Hi” speed screw controls the amount of fuel at full throttle.

Below are the exact steps you need to follow;

  • Remove the air filter cover by unscrewing the knob.
  • Remove and clean the air filter.
  • A dirty air filter can disrupt the proper adjustments you make to the carburetor.
  • Clean any debris or buildup off the spark arrestor screen and the muffler.
  • Turn the leaf blower off.
  • Turn the “Hi” speed screw counterclockwise to the stop position with the flat-head screwdriver.
  • Turn the” Lo” speed screw halfway between the stops.
  • Turn the idle speed screw until it barely touches the throttle plate.
  • Turn the idle speed screw clockwise three complete turns.
  • Start the leaf blower to let it warm up.
  • Run it at idle and then at full throttle to completely warm it up.
  • Check to feel if the engine idles smoothly and transitions smoothly during acceleration.
  • If the engine shows signs of hesitation, turn the “Lo” speed screw counterclockwise about one-eighth turn until the acceleration is smooth.

How to mix fuel for Echo 2520 leaf blower

The recommended ratio is 50:1 with the resulting mixture containing 1 US Gal. 89 octane plus 2.6 fl. oz. ECHO PowerBlend Oil or ECHO Red Armor Oil

Mixing Instructions

1. Fill an approved fuel container with half of the required amount of gasoline.

2. Add the proper amount of 2-stroke oil to gasoline.

3. Close container and shake to mix oil with gasoline.

4. Add remaining gasoline, close fuel container, and remix.

Note: Do not store a unit with fuel in its tank. Leaks can occur. Always return the unused fuel to an approved fuel storage container.

Echo leaf blower fuel type and fuel ratio

Use a 50:1 ratio of fuel to oil mix for 2-stroke cycle engines, recommend using only fresh gas with a minimum octane rating of 89 or higher (mid-grade to premium) at all times

Gasoline

Use 89 Octane [R+M/2] (mid grade or higher) gasoline known to be good quality. Gasoline may contain up to 15% MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether). Gasohol containing methyl (wood) alcohol is NOT approved.

Oil

Use a two-stroke engine oil meeting ISO-L-EGD (ISO/CD13738) and J.A.S.O. FC Standards must be used. Echo brand premium Power Blend TM Universal 2-Stroke Oil meets these standards. Engine problems due to inadequate lubrication caused by failure to use an ISO-L-EGD and J.A.S.O. FC certified oil, such as Echo premium Power Blend TM, will void the two-stroke engine warranty. (Emission related parts only are covered for two years, regardless of two-stroke oil used, per the statement listed in the Emission Defect Warranty Explanation.)

Fuel to oil mix 50:1 ratio
USMetric
GasOilGasOil
GallonFluid OuncesLitercc.
12.65100
25.210200
51325500

Why is my Echo leaf blower running rough?

This may prevent you from using the leaf blower. Keep reading to learn some of the reasons why your leaf blower is running rough;

Clogged Carburetor

The carburetor might be clogged. A clogged carburetor is most commonly caused by leaving fuel in the leaf blower for a long period of time. Over time, some of the ingredients in the fuel may evaporate, leaving behind a thicker, stickier substance.

This sticky fuel can clog up the carburetor and cause the engine to run roughly. If the carburetor is clogged, try cleaning it with carburetor cleaner. If cleaning the carburetor isn’t effective, rebuild or replace the entire carburetor.

Clogged Fuel Filter

The fuel filter might be clogged. A clogged fuel filter is most commonly caused by leaving fuel in the leaf blower for a long period of time. Over time, some of the ingredients in the fuel may evaporate, leaving behind a thicker, stickier substance.

This sticky fuel can clog the fuel filter and cause the engine to run roughly. If old fuel was left in the leaf blower, drain the old fuel from the fuel tank and replace the fuel filter.

Clogged Air Filter

The air filter may be clogged. If the air filter is clogged, the engine will get too much fuel and not enough air. As a result, the engine may run roughly. If the air filter is clogged, replace it.

Damaged Spark Plugs

Inspect the spark plug for signs of wear or damage. If the porcelain insulator is cracked, an electrode is burned away or damaged, or there is heavy carbon buildup at the electrode, replace the spark plug.

To determine if the spark plug is defective, use a spark plug tester. You should see a strong spark between the tester’s terminals when the engine is cranking. If there is no spark, this indicates that the spark plug is defective and should be replaced.

Clogged Spark Arrestor

The spark arrestor is a small screen that prevents the engine from emitting sparks. Over time, the spark arrestor can become clogged with soot. If the spark arrestor is clogged, the engine run roughly. To unclog the spark arrestor, remove it and clean it with a wire brush. You may also replace the spark arrestor.

Can I make my Echo leaf blower less noisy?

When it comes to leaf blowers, the first thought is usually how irritating they can be. In fact, the majority of blowers that people are familiar with are the ones that are noisy enough to disturb the neighbors. In reality, there are “quiet” leaf blowers, or low noise blowers available that resolve this issue.

Not only are quiet leaf blowers sound reduced overall, but ECHO has designed the low noise blower to include sound absorbing materials that eliminate the whine typical of older designs. They also use a unique muffler concept that lessens exhaust sounds and incorporate a patented sound attenuator that quiets the air intake system. The fan and cowling were redesigned to lessen the airflow sound while maintaining the efficiency and performance of the device.

How to clean Echo leaf blower carburetor

The function of the carburetor is to control the amount of fuel (fuel-to-air ratio) that gets into the combustion chamber of the engine. Over prolonged usage, dirt gets stuck in the carburetor. If it is left unchecked, the dust will accumulate until it eventually hinders the engine from functioning optimally.

Dirt in your carburetor will lead to fuel inefficiency as the combustion of the fuel will not be total, which means that there will be more carbon emissions. It would also be more challenging to do a cold start.

Proper maintenance of the carburetor would not only improve the functioning of the leaf blower. It also ensures the longevity of the engine. You shouldn’t wait until your blower doesn’t start before you have the carburetor checked. There ought to be a detailed schedule for the maintenance of this vital engine element.

Items needed

  • Carburetor cleaner
  • A small container
  • Screwdrivers or Allen keys (as your specific blower may require) to loosen the bolts
  • Spark plug spanner
  • Compressed air blower or fan blower

Cleaning steps;

  • Remove the carburetor from the leaf blower.
  • You can remove the carburetor by following these easy steps:
  • Drain the fuel in the pan or tub to empty the fuel tank.
    • Disconnect the spark plug connection to prevent any harm.
    • Unscrew the air filter cover carefully.
    • Carefully remove the carburetor by loosening the screws.
    • Disengage the air-box from the carburetor throttle and choke levers.
    • Eliminate the fuel lines for the complete removal of the carburetor.
    • Make sure to remember the removal process for the reinstallation process.
  • Carefully pull the carburetor off by dismounting it from the engine while protecting the engine gasket.
  • Clean the dust, dirt, or debris by using compressed air, soft bristle brush, and carburetor cleaner solvent for easy and quick cleaning.
  • Fill a metal pan with carburetor cleaner and place the carburetor in the pan to soak for several minutes.
  • Pick up the carburetor and allow as much of the cleaner to drain off as possible.
  • Wipe the outside dry with a clean rag.
  • Clean the fuel filter by using carburetor cleaning spray for dust and brush for the clogged dirt.
  • You can use the tube applicator to blow out the carburetor housings.
  • You can also clean the housings directly spraying through the fuel connecting tubes.
  • Using compressed air, blow out the extra solvent and rest of the residual from the carburetor ports to ensure the complete cleaning.
  • Use compressed air to dry out all the ports, housings, and the entire carburetor.
  • Reassemble the carburetor by following the disassembly process in reverse.
  • Blow out any cleaner left in the passages of the carburetor, using pressurized air.
  • Block the low and high mixture screw holes with your fingers, and spray carburetor cleaner through the pickup orifice.
  • Blow air through the orifice to dry it, and reassemble the carburetor to complete the job.
  • Reconnect the fuel lines to the carburetor correctly.
  • Set the carburetor right back into the air-box by performing reverse tracking.
  • Install the carburetor by adequately mounting the screws at the specific location on the engine.
  • Reconnect the spark plug wire for spark ignition.

Safety Reminders;

  1. Clean the air filter by checking the flow of the air through it during the carburetor cleaning process.
  2. Ensure the proper protection of eyes and skin to prevent any harm from the solvents.
  3. Clean and replace the air and fuel filters as required.
  4. Refill the engine with the clean, new, and fresh oil after the cleaning process.
  5. Make sure before reinstallation that there is no leakage and blocking in the fuel lines and the primer bulb.

How to Replace the Carburetor on a Leaf Blower

If cleaning the carburetor does not fix the underlying issue, the carburetor may be damaged and you need to replace it. Follow the steps below to replace it.

  • Remove the air filter cover.
  • Unscrew the retaining bolt and pull gently to remove the air filter cover.
  • Remove the air filter base.
  • Remove the two nuts holding the air filter base using a ratchet wrench.
  • Remove the air filter base.
  • Remove the throttle cable from the carburetor.
  • Retract the throttle arm slightly to create slack in the throttle cable; remove the cable from the carburetor assembly.
  • Remove the fuel lines from the carburetor.

Note: It is advisable to clamp the fuel lines prior to removal. If you do not have fuel line clamps, you can drain the fuel from the fuel tank.

  • Clamp fuel lines with fuel line clamps.
  • Use a flathead screwdriver and/or long-nosed pliers to disconnect the fuel lines from the carburetor.
  • Remove the carburetor from the engine.
  • Slide the carburetor assembly off of the retaining bolts and away from the engine.
  • Remove the carburetor gasket from the heat dam assembly (or verify that the gasket is still connected to the carburetor throttle plate).
  • Reinstall the carburetor assembly.

Note: During installation, ensure that the throttle plate is facing the engine, and the choke plate is facing away from the engine.

  • Reinstall the carburetor gasket.
  • Reinstall the carburetor assembly.
  • Reinstall the air filter base.
  • Secure the air filter base and the carburetor to the engine with the two nuts removed earlier.
  • Reinstall the fuel lines.
  • Reattach the fuel lines to the carburetor and remove the fuel line clamps.
  • Reinstall the throttle cable.
  • Retract the throttle arm slightly and – using long-nosed pliers — install the throttle cable into the attachment recess.
  • Reinstall the air filter cover.
  • Reposition and seat the air filter gasket; align and secure the air filter cover.

How to clean and maintain your Echo leaf blower

Regular cleaning and maintenance of the leaf blower will not only make it perform better it will also help to prolong its lifespan. Follow the steps below to clean and maintain your leaf blower.

Practice Daily Checkups

Some parts of an Echo leaf blower require regular monitoring. Typically, these areas should be cleaned and inspected before you use the blower each time. Start with the choke shutter, which moves the choke from the closed position to the open position. Examine it to ensure that the shutter is clean so it won’t become stuck during use. You should also inspect and clean the cooling system prior to each use.

Remove any debris from the intake grill between the backpack frame and blower housing in backpack models and the crankcase intake grill above the fuel tank in handheld models. Remove the spark plug lead from the spark plug so you can remove the plug and the engine cover. Clean the cylinder fins of any dirt or debris to keep air moving freely. Reassemble the blower’s parts in reverse order.

Keep Filters Clean

The air and fuel filters on an Echo leaf blower are key components to look at during a tune-up. Inspect and clean the air filter, if necessary, before each use. To clean it, close the blower’s choke to prevent the carburetor throat from getting dirty when the filter is removed. Remove the filter cover, air filter, retainer and foam pre-filter; wipe away any dirt from inside the cover.

Clean the pre-filter with detergent mixed with water and rinse thoroughly. Allow it to dry completely before reinserting it. Brush any dirt or debris away from the filter and reassemble. Replace the air filter every three months or when you notice damage such as extreme dirt on the surface or the rubber sealing edges becoming warped.

Examine the leaf blower’s fuel filter every three months when the fuel tank is empty. With a clean cloth, wipe away any dirt or debris around the fuel cap and the empty tank. Replace the fuel filter once a year with the “fuel line hook” from the Echo Repower Air and Filter Kit, pull the fuel line and filter free from the tank and replace it with a fresh filter.

Inspect the Spark Plug

You should examine, clean, and replace the leaf blower’s spark plug if necessary every three months. Remove the spark plug, located at the top the blower, and inspect it for any signs of wear or fouling. If the spark plug is dirty, use a clean rag to wipe away dirt and debris.

Replace the plug if there are signs of damage or dirt that cannot be wiped away check the owner’s manual to see what type of spark plug to use. Most Echo leaf blowers require an NGK BPM8Y spark plug. Bend the outer electrode to adjust the spark plug gap, and tighten it according to the instructions for the appropriate model.

Examine the Muffler

Examine and clean the leaf blower’s muffler spark arrestor every three months to ensure that carbon deposits aren’t causing a decrease in engine output or the engine to overheat. The spark arrestor screen typically requires replacement every three months. Start by removing the spark plug lead from the spark plug so you can remove the engine cover.

Next, remove the exhaust deflector, spark arrestor cover, gasket and spark arrestor screen. Wipe away dirt or debris from the muffler components with a clean rag. Install the new spark arrestor screen and reassemble the gasket, plate, deflector and cover. Once all of the screws are tightened, attach the spark plug lead to the spark plug to reassemble.

Leaf Blower Maintenance

Specific aspects of leaf blower maintenance may differ between models. Ensure you read your leaf blower manual before starting to work on it. It may have a maintenance schedule.

Always follow manufacturer’s instructions. You should also contact the manufacturer with any concerns or questions. Maintaining and storing your leaf blower properly will make leaf cleanup faster.

Tools needed

  • Ratchet
  • Spark Plug Socket
  • Screwdriver
  • Box Wrenches
  • Spark Plug Gap Tool or Feeler Gauge
  • Materials
  • Engine Oil
  • Fuel Stabilizer
  • Spark Plug
  • Air Filter
  • Fuel Filter (If Equipped)

Safety precautions:

  1. Work in a well-ventilated area if you have a gasoline-powered leaf blower. Use a drop cloth in your work area to make cleanup easier.
  2. Turn your leaf blower off and let all moving parts come to a stop before performing any maintenance, cleaning or inspections.
  3. Remove the spark plug wire from the spark plug on a gasoline-powered leaf blower.
  4. Disconnect an electric leaf blower from its power supply.
  5. Follow any pre-maintenance procedures the manufacturer specifies.
  6. The blower engine or motor may be hot. Don’t operate a gasoline-powered leaf blower indoors or in an area that doesn’t have proper ventilation.

Gas Blowers: General Maintenance

Step 1: Get the Blower Ready for Maintenance

Turn the blower off and make sure all moving parts are stopped. Remove the spark plug cover or boot and wire from the end of the spark plug. Follow any additional pre-maintenance procedures the manufacturer specifies.

  • Step 2: Clean the Blower
  • Step 3: Inspect the Blower
  • Step 4: Check the Air Filter
  • Step 5: Check the Spark Plug
  • Step 6: Reconnect the Spark Plug

Gas Blowers: Check and Add Oil (4-Cycle Engines)

Prepare the Blower

Turn the blower off and make sure all moving parts are stopped. Remove the spark plug wire from the spark plug and follow any additional pre-maintenance procedures the manufacturer specifies.

Check the Oil

Gas Blowers: oil change (4-Cycle Engines)

  • Turn the blower off and make sure all moving parts are stopped.
  • Remove the spark plug wire from the spark plug and follow any additional pre-maintenance procedures the manufacturer specifies.
  • Drain the Used Oil
  • Add Fresh Oil
  • Dispose of the Used Oil Properly

Electric Blowers: Cleaning and Battery Care

  • Wipe down the blower with a clean cloth.
  • Inspect the blower for loose, damaged or missing parts.
  • Tighten loose fasteners and have damaged or missing parts replaced before using the blower.
  • Check the air intake for dirt, debris and anything that might block air flow.

Note: For cordless blowers, follow the manufacturer’s instructions for battery maintenance. You may need to remove the battery from the charger once it’s at full capacity, store the battery at a specific level of charge or periodically charge it during the offseason. Some batteries have cooling vents that need to be kept clear of dirt and debris.

Monthly Maintenance for Gasoline Leaf Blowers

  • Replace the fuel filter.
  • Clean the outside of the carburetor and fan blades.
  • Examine the fuel line, fuel filter, cables and connections.
  • Check the spark plug and replace it if needed.

Storing Your Leaf Blower

  • Don’t overlook the importance of storing your leaf blower properly.
  • Allow the blower to cool before storing it.
  • Store the leaf blower in a dry, well-ventilated place to ensure fumes don’t come into contact with sparks or open flames.
  • Make sure the leaf blower is out of the reach of children.

Note: Most manufacturers recommend draining the fuel system or running it dry before storage, or they may specify storing the blower with the tank full of fuel mixed with a fuel stabilizer for long-term storage. If you drain the fuel, contact your local recycling center for disposal instructions and dispose of the fuel properly.

Echo leaf blower not priming

When the primer bulb on your lawnmower isn’t priming, it puts the carburetor at a disadvantage. Designed to replace air in the fuel lines and carburetor with gasoline when you depress the button several times, a primer bulb provides a crucial service that makes starting the engine easier.

Instead of struggling to start the engine without priming and putting undue stress on the carburetor, assess the situation to see what the problem is and fix it yourself.

Faulty Priming Symptoms

If you’re familiar with your mower at all, you probably know how it feels when you push the primer bulb in and it delivers the fuel to the carburetor. There’s a slight resistance when you push it, and you can feel that it’s pulling fuel from the gas tank.

When it’s not working, however, the bulb may refuse to pop back out after you depress it. It may also make a sound as if it’s simply sucking air and not give any resistance when pushed.

Possible Problems

When the primer bulb isn’t working, it may be a problem with the bulb itself, with the fuel lines that feed fuel to the bulb or both. Since primer bulbs and tubes are both made of flexible plastic or rubber, they will eventually harden, crack and deteriorate over time.

A primer bulb that’s lost its suppleness doesn’t respond as a new one does. The same goes for fuel lines. When they’ve hardened and cracked, they let in air, which makes it impossible to draw the fuel into the carburetor properly.

Primer Bulb Replacement

Primer bulbs are usually positioned on the lawnmower one of two ways. They’re either directly on the carburetor, or placed at a distance from the carburetor and connected to it with rubber tubing. Once you’ve gained access to the bulb’s housing, remove the screws that hold it in place.

Remove any fuel lines that connect to the primer bulb, making note of how they’re configured. Install the new primer bulb and reconnect any fuel lines as necessary. Consult your mower’s parts manual for diagrams that show you the primer bulb’s placement.

Fuel Line Replacement

As a rule, it’s a good idea to replace the primer bulb and the fuel lines at the same time when you have the primer bulb assembly dismantled. Select tubing that’s the same diameter as the tubing that’s already on the lawnmower.

Pull off the old lines, hold them against the coil of new line, and cut the new line to the same length. Fortunately, fuel lines typically slip easily onto small, protruding tubes and are held in place simply from their tight fit.

Echo leaf blower not getting spark

If there is no spark, this indicates that the spark plug is defective and should be replaced. If your leaf blower has fuel but fails to start, either the ignition coil, the spark plug lead, or the spark plug is faulty.

The magneto on your leaf blower delivers a pulse of low voltage electricity to the ignition coil. The ignition coil itself is a step-up transformer containing a primary and secondary coil. These coils boost magneto voltage high enough to ignite the fuel/air mixture in the cylinder by jumping the gap between the spark plug electrodes.

Use an ignition tester to test the spark plug, the plug lead, and the ignition coil;

  • Remove the spark plug lead by pulling the rubber boot off the plug.
  • Clamp the alligator clip on the ignition tester to the spark plug and insert the other end of the tester into the connector inside the rubber boot.
  • Pull the starter rope, but stay clear of the ignition tester leads to avoid a shock.
  • Pay close attention to the transparent window of the ignition tester while pulling the starter rope.
  • If you see a bright blue spark jump across the terminals in the tester window and the engine starts, both the ignition coil and spark plug are in working order.
  • If not, go to the next step.
  • Remove the alligator clip from the spark plug and clamp it onto a bolt on the leaf blower’s cylinder head.
  • Pull the starter rope; if you see a bright blue spark jump across the tester window, the spark plug is defective and must be replaced.
  • If there is still no spark, either the coil itself has burned out, or the plug lead is defective.
  • Replace the plug lead and retest. If you do not see a spark jump the gap, the coil is defective and must be replaced.

Echo leaf blower not blowing air

If your blower is not blowing air, check the following parts and repair as needed.

Fans

Your leaf blower manual may refer to a fan, which is simply another name for the impeller. As above, the fan is attached to the crankshaft, and when it rotates it provides airflow. Your leaf blower’s fan will have several fins that move the air while the fan is operating.

Occasionally, rocks and debris can be sucked up into these fins, causing damage. Damaged fins can cause the fan to malfunction, resulting in the inability to blow air. See the above description of the impeller for more information on why a faulty or damaged fan might cause this symptom.

Nuts

The impeller nut attaches the impeller or fan to the crankshaft. Sometimes the impeller nut is a lock nut, but other times the nut is secured with Loctite. If the nut comes lose, the crankshaft might spin without rotating the impeller. If the impeller does not rotate, then airflow is not created, which will result in this symptom.

To complete this repair, you will need to access the inside of your leaf blower, so be sure that you have disconnected the spark plug from the blower engine before you begin this repair.

Tubes

The tubes in your leaf blower typically direct the flow of air during operation. However, in some models, the tubes funnel air down to a nozzle that increases the speed of the airflow. In this case, it might seem as if the blower isn’t blowing air, or isn’t blowing enough air. This can be a result of missing or damaged tubes.

A quick note before you replace your tubes: some leaf blowers allow you to redirect the airflow passing through the blower housing, which allows the blower to act as a vacuum. In this case, your blower may be on the incorrect setting, which can prevent it from blowing air.

Impellers

If your blower starts and the throttle runs properly but it still does not blow air, there are a variety of parts that might be causing it. The impeller is essentially a fan blade that draws air into the blower housing and forces it out the blower tube.

The impeller is installed in the blower housing, where you can find it attached to the crankshaft of the engine. When the crankshaft turns, it rotates the impeller, which causes air to flow through the blower.

If your leaf blower does not blow air, it is possible that debris has been sucked into the blower housing, impeding the impeller from doing its job. If the impeller is loose or the blades of the impeller are damaged or broken off, it can also cause the blower to become unable to blow air.

Echo leaf blower will not stay running

If the engine on your blower runs then dies, you might need to check the tank vent, ignition coil, or gas cap. Our repair guide can help you identify your problem and show you how to fix it with the right part. Our repair information is a general guide to help you, but for more specific repair information related to your model, check your owner’s manual.

Fuel Filters

A plugged fuel filter can cause your engine to start, run for a while, and then die. The fuel filter on your leaf blower connects to the fuel line and filters out any debris that may be in the fuel tank. Over time, this debris can build up in the filter and make it more difficult for fuel to enter the lines and ultimately get to the engine.

If the obstruction is minor, the engine will run for a little while before dying, rather than almost immediately after the engine starts. To fix the issue, you may be able to clean your fuel filter, but if it is faulty or damaged it will need to be replaced.

Spark Plugs

A bad spark plug can cause the engine to die at any time. When your leaf blower is running properly, the spark plug will ignite compressed fuel and air with every rotation of the piston within the cylinder.

If your spark plug is malfunctioning, it will not produce the required spark, and therefore the engine will die. As mentioned, if your spark plug is faulty, this can happen to your engine at any time.

Caps

A vented gas cap can cause this problem. If the vent is plugged, a vacuum will form as the fuel level drops. After a while, the vacuum will be stronger than your carburetor’s ability to pump fuel and the engine will die. To solve this problem, you can allow the engine to sit for a short period of time, or you can remove and replace the gas cap. After you apply one of these solutions, the engine should start again.

Fuel Lines

The fuel lines on your blower carry fuel from the tank to the engine. If these fuel lines are obstructed, it can’t allow the proper amount of fuel to enter the engine, which will cause it to run for a short time, but ultimately stall out. You may be able to clean out the fuel lines and solve this problem.

Check this too: Dewalt Leaf Blower How to and Troubleshooting Guide

However, because these lines are usually made of plastic, they can crack and begin to leak. This can allow air to enter the fuel system which will cause it to die after a short period of running. If the crack is small, this can cause the engine to die somewhat unexpectedly, as very little fuel is leaking out. If you discover a crack in your fuel line, you will most likely need to replace it.

Ignition Modules

Your leaf blowers’ ignition coil provides voltage to the spark plug, which then ignites the fuel mixture that runs the blower. A faulty ignition coil will normally only fail once the engine has run long enough for the coil to become hot. If you discover that your blower is dying after it runs for a little while (basically until it gets hot), your ignition coil may be faulty and will likely need to be replaced.

To determine whether your ignition coil is the cause of this symptom, you can test your ignition coil by first disconnecting the spark plug from the engine and (while it is still connected to the ignition coil) setting it on the engine itself. At this point, you can attempt to run your engine and look for a spark from the spark plug. If no spark is present, it could be the result of a faulty ignition coil.

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